Romitaman Original Comic Book Art: Your Friendly Neighborhood Art Dealer

"ALWAYS BUYING AND TRADING FOR ANY AND ALL COMIC BOOK ART AND COMIC BOOK STRIP ART"

(330) 221-5665 or mikeburkey@aol.com

  Featured Items
Media Type: Pencil and Ink
Art Type: Pinup
Artists: Winsor McCay pencils and inks

Winsor McCay was an early animation pioneer, Inspired by the flip books his son brought home, McCay "came to see the possibility of making moving pictures" of his cartoons. Gertie the Dinosaur was an interactive routine in which McCay appeared to give orders to a trained dinosaur. McCay said he was most proud of his animation work. Gertie the Dinosaur" was animation's first superstar. Winsor McCay drew each individual scene by hand on rice paper before the use of nitrate cels. "Gertie" was the first film to use animation techniques such key frames, registration marks and tracing paper. It influenced the next generation of animators.... These 2 great scenes used in Winsor McCay's cartoons were drawn in Pen and ink on rice paper measuring 6.5 by 9 inches each and glued onto 2 separate boards. There are Glue stains at the corners which are on ALL of the few Gertie drawings that even exist to this day! Just HISTORIC ART HERE FOLKS By one of the the ICONIC CREATORS OF OUR ENTIRE MEDIUM, WELL OVER 100 YEARS OLD! Gertie the Dinosaur debuted in February 1914 as part of McCay's vaudeville act. Gertie was McCay's first piece of animation with detailed backgrounds. McCay drew the foreground characters, while art student neighbor John A. Fitzsimmons traced the backgrounds. McCay pioneered the "McCay Split System" of inbetweening, in which major poses or positions were drawn first, and the intervening frames drawn after. This relieved tedium and improved the timing of the film's actions. introduced Gertie as "the only dinosaur in captivity",and commanded the animated beast with a whip. Gertie seemed to obey McCay, bowing to the audience, and eating a tree and a boulder, though she had a will of her own and sometimes rebelled. When McCay admonished her, she cried. McCay consoled her by throwing her an appleā€”in reality pocketing the cardboard prop apple as a cartoon one simultaneously appeared on screen. In the finale, McCay walked offstage, reappeared in animated form in the film, and had Gertie carry him away. Producer William Fox's Box Office Attractions obtained distribution rights to a modified version of Gertie that could be played in regular movie theaters. This version was prefaced with a live-action sequence and replaced the interactive portions with intertitles. Between 1911 and 1921 he self-financed and animated ten films. ALL art on our website (including this one) are able to be purchased with VERY fair time payments, and trades are always considered towards "ANY" art on our website! Just send us an email to mikeburkey@aol.com and we can try to work something out.

$11,000.00